Boris Johnson denies lying to Queen over suspension of parliament

12 September 2019, 12:43 | Updated: 12 September 2019, 12:47

A court has ruled that the advice given by ministers to the Queen over prorogation was 'unlawful'
A court has ruled that the advice given by ministers to the Queen over prorogation was 'unlawful'. Picture: PA
Sylvia De Luca

By Sylvia De Luca

The Prime Minister insisted he sought the suspension so that the Government could set out a new legislative programme in a Queen's Speech on October 14.

Scotland's highest civil court ruled on Wednesday that the five-week prorogation was unlawful.

Opposition MPs have argued that the real reason was to stop Parliament holding the Government to account over its Brexit plans.

But, asked during a visit to mark London International Shipping Week whether he had lied to the monarch in order to obtain the prorogation, Mr Johnson replied: "Absolutely not."

He said the High Court in England had taken the opposite view to the Court of Session in Edinburgh and that the case would now be decided in the Supreme Court.

"The High Court in England plainly agrees with us but the Supreme Court will have to decide. We need a Queen's Speech, we need to get on and do all sorts of things at a national level," he said.

"Absolutely not," says Boris Johnson when asked if he misled the monarch over the controversial five-week shutdown.
"Absolutely not," says Boris Johnson when asked if he misled the monarch over the controversial five-week shutdown. Picture: PA

Britain is due to leave the EU on 31st October but it is uncertain whether that will be with or without a deal.

"Parliament will have time both before and after that crucial summit [of EU leaders] on October 17th and 18th to talk about the Brexit deal," Mr Johnson said.

"I'm very hopeful that we will get a deal, as I say, at that crucial summit. We're working very hard - I've been around the European capitals talking to our friends.

"I think we can see the rough area of a landing space, of how you can do it - it will be tough, it will be hard, but I think we can get there."

Mr Johnson was speaking after the government was forced to release documents relating to its "Operation Yellowhammer" preparations for a no-deal Brexit.

A five-page summary published online on Wednesday warns of the possibility of a rise in public disorder, delays lasting three months at Channel crossings, "significant" electricity price rises and impacts on medicine and food supplies.

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