Iconic British landmarks left deserted amid coronavirus pandemic

26 March 2020, 19:55

Buckingham Palace is usually crowded with tourists but has been left deserted
Buckingham Palace is usually crowded with tourists but has been left deserted. Picture: PA

By Tobi Akingbade

Britain’s most iconic landmarks have been left deserted in the beautiful spring sunshine as the nation stays indoors to try and contain the spread of coronavirus.

Following strict government guidelines to stay indoors, the public have left the pavements outside Buckingham Palace totally empty on Tuesday.

The daily ceremony of the Changing of the Guard, popular with visitors to the city, has been suspended until further notice.

The Millennium Bridge over the Thames was deserted as galleries, cafes, restaurants, and pubs were told they must shut up shop until the worst of the virus has passed.

Tourist hotspot Trafalgar Square was also eerily quiet
Tourist hotspot Trafalgar Square was also eerily quiet. Picture: PA

The station at Canary Wharf, the heart of London’s financial district, was empty on Tuesday, after only a handful of jobs were given a key worker status.

The view of St Paul’s from the south bank of the river was completely clear of people this week, while Tower Bridge was also free of its usual queues of traffic.

Regent Street was also spookily quiet
Regent Street was also spookily quiet. Picture: PA

In Bath, the popular limestone streets were missing tourists and shoppers as all non-essential businesses were told they had to close.

In Bournemouth, the beach would normally be packed with locals and visitors enjoying the spring sunshine.

Bournemouth beach was deserted despite the warm weather
Bournemouth beach was deserted despite the warm weather. Picture: PA

Instead, it was almost completely empty except for a few joggers and dog walkers trying to keep a safe distance apart.

Meanwhile, drivers and taxis have gone by the new rules to stay at home causing air quality in London to rise sharply since the lockdown came into force.

There have been big drops in nitrogen dioxide and tiny particles known as PM2.5, which can contribute to respiratory illnesses.

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