Lloyds of London and pub chain Greene King apologise for historical slave trade links

18 June 2020, 10:14

Greene King and Lloyd's of London have both apologised over historical links to the slave trade
Greene King and Lloyd's of London have both apologised over historical links to the slave trade. Picture: PA

By Asher McShane

Insurers Lloyd's of London and pub chain Greene King have apologised over historical links to the slave trade after they were named in a list of companies connected to slavery.

The two firms were identified on a list compiled by University College London (UCL) of firms with links to slavery in their past.

A Lloyd’s spokesman told the Telegraph: “We are sorry for the role played by the Lloyd’s market in the 18th and 19th century slave trade.“We will provide financial support to charities and organisations promoting opportunity and inclusion for black and minority ethnic groups.”

Greene King's boss Nick Mackenzie said: “It is inexcusable that one of our founders profited from slavery and argued against its abolition in the 1800s.

“We don’t have all the answers, so that is why we are taking time to listen and learn from all the voices, including our team members and charity partners, as we strengthen our diversity and inclusion work.”

Both firms have said they will make payments to organisations to help address the roles their founders had in the trans-Atlantic slave trade.

Mr Mackenzie said Greene King would make a "substantial investment" to benefit the black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) community and work to support its own race diversity.

Lloyd's, which was founded in 1688, insured slave ships and the founder of the Greene King chain, Benjamin Greene, was a plantation owner and is said to have held hundreds of people in slavery.

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