Matt Hancock hails ‘promising’ Oxford Covid-19 vaccine work as distribution deal reached

30 April 2020, 08:45

The Health Secretary described the progress as "promising"
The Health Secretary described the progress as "promising". Picture: PA

By Asher McShane

The Health Secretary today praised the "promising" progress towards a Covid-19 vaccine made by Oxford University researchers.

Matt Hancock's remarks came as he announced that the University of Oxford has partnered with pharmaceutical giant AstraZenenca for the development, manufacture and large-scale distribution of the Covid-19 vaccine candidate that is currently being trialled in the UK.

The agreement was announced on Thursday, with the details set to be finalised in the coming weeks.

The move will allow for rapid vaccination around the world if the candidate proves to be effective, the university said.

Human trials of the vaccine developed by the University's Jenner Institute began last week, with hundreds of people volunteering to be part of the study which received £20 million in Government funding.

Professor Sir John Bell, Regius Professor of Medicine at Oxford University described the partnership with AstraZeneca as a "major force in the struggle against pandemics" for the foreseeable future.

It is the first such partnership to be formed since the Government launched the Vaccines Taskforce two weeks ago to help find a new coronavirus vaccine.

Both partners have agreed to operate on a not-for-profit basis for the duration of the pandemic, the university said, with only the costs of production and distribution being covered.

Listen & subscribe: Global Player | Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said it was "hugely welcome news" that Oxford University had come to an agreement with AstraZeneca to scale up its coronavirus vaccine.

He tweeted: "The Oxford vaccine is one of the most advanced in the world. Bringing together the best British science and the best of British business will give us the best possible shot at a vaccine.

"The science is uncertain, and no vaccine may work, but this deal gives the UK the best chance we can of a breakthrough that could defeat this awful virus. I'm sending best wishes for good fortune to all involved - for the sake of the nation and indeed the whole world."

Happening Now