Awe inspiring moment 750,000 poppies are dropped from WW2 plane on Remembrance day

10 November 2019, 12:02 | Updated: 10 November 2019, 13:36

The poppies cascade from the WW2 plane
The poppies cascade from the WW2 plane. Picture: Twitter @janewilders

By Asher McShane

This is the ‘awe inspiring’ moment a WW2 plane drops three-quarters of a million poppies over the white cliffs of Dover.

The poppies were dropped from the original Second World War Dakota plane in a poignant tribute to fallen troops on Remembrance Sunday.

The bio-degradable flowers fell across the Kent countryside on Remembrance Sunday.

The Dakota plane was joined by two Spitfures in a flypast which marked 74 years since the end of WW2.

One of the Spitfires following a World War II Dakota before it dropped three-quarters-of-a-million poppies over the White Cliffs of Dover
One of the Spitfires following a World War II Dakota before it dropped three-quarters-of-a-million poppies over the White Cliffs of Dover. Picture: PA

Jane Wilders said: “Awe inspiring moment over the white cliffs of Dover. Such an amazing experience to witness.”

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Another witness wrote online: "What a roar as I was watching Remembrannce Sunday at the Cenotaph. The Dekota and two spitfires returning from dropping poppies over the White Cliffs of Dover. Flying over the top of the house."

Veterans from several conflicts, including the Second World War, Northern Ireland, Iraq and Afghanistan, signalled the drop from on board the Dakota as the formation reaches the sky above the cliffs.

The event was the brainchild of Kent-based Aero Legends, with proceeds going to the annual Poppy Appeal.

Aero Legends managing director Ben Perkins said: “Commemorations like this are incredibly important to remember those who fought and continue to fight for our freedom.”

The poppies were dropped at 11am above the Battle of Britain War Memorial at the cliffs.

The Dakota carried five veterans, including three former RAF men who served during the Second World War.

The battle-scarred aircraft – known to its crew at the time as “Drag ‘Em Oot” – is itself a veteran of the conflict and took part in the troop drops on D-Day.

It still has 40 bullet holes in its fuselage dating back to those battles.

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